"Learning From Fido" (or, the real gurrrrus online)

If dogs were teachers we would all learn a great deal about life, love, and work including
the internet.

I received a simple e-mail message from one of my online friends recently that pointed out
some of the traits of dogs which are positive. admirable, and worthy of imitation.

For example: Dogs always run to greet you when you come home and they are happy to
see you. No questions about where you have been or why you were late. They are just very
happy that you are home.

They are great at knowing when to take a nap or on warm days they know when to stop and
lie back in the grass and relax.

One of our Poms that we had was good at reminding me when it was time for a break from
the computer by jumping up on my leg for some attention.

On hot days, they drink lots of water and find a nice shade tree to get under.

When they are happy, they just dance around and wag their entire bodies.

No matter how often they are scolded, they don't bear grudges...they just run right back
and make friends.

Most dogs will avoid biting when a simple growl will do. ( Could this be applied to some
people's over-reaction to spam messages ?)

Dogs like to run, romp and play daily, and yet they can find delight in the simple joy of a long
walk with you.

They can eat with a great deal of gusto and enthusiasm, but stop when they have had

They are loyal.

They never pretend to be something that they are not. ( gurrrus...maybe ?)

If they want something and it lies buried, they simply dig until they find it.

When someone is having a bad day, they can be silent, sit close by and nuzzle gently.

Well, wouldn't life online and off be simpler and better for all if we adopted many of the qualities that we find in our dogs ?

Hoping that you have a GRRREAT day !
Best of luck in your online efforts .

Larry Johnson, Author

Best Spyware Removers

Finding the best spyware removers to detect and remove spyware and adware from your computer is much easier if you consider a few things before you make your purchase. Here are a few things to keep in mind when looking for a spyware protection program.

The best spyware removers should offer you complete protection against spyware, adware, keyloggers, Remote Access Trojans (RATs), and browser hijackers. These are the main spyware infections that expose your confidential information and diminish your PC's performance.

An important consideration for any spyware protection program is automatic updates for your software. There are new spyware programs invented on a regular basis just like viruses and automatic updates cover you against the latest spyware threats.

Another important consideration to look for should be technical support from the manufacturer. A spyware protection program doesn't do you any good if you have a technical issue that you can't solve. Often, just a minor piece of technical advice will solve most software problems and it's important that your software run right. You also may need someone to answer questions that come up.

Customer service is another feature you may consider looking for. It shows the
manufacturer is a trusted source who cares about their reputation and will probably be around awhile.

Spyware is quickly becoming a major threat to Internet security. It is reported that 9 out of 10 computers are currently infected with spyware, adware or both. Most people don't even realize it's there because spyware and adware is programmed to run silently. Microsoft estimates that spyware is responsible for 50% of all PC crashes.

If you don't remove spyware from your computer it will eventually not work at all or your computer files will become infected by spyware programs. Your personal information, passwords and credit card numbers could end up stolen from you without you even knowing it.

Once you remove spyware and adware programs from your computer you'll find it will run faster and your personal information will be much safer. Your security and peace of mind is worth spending a little time to find the best spyware removers possible.

By: Gary Gresham

Computer Security

Advances in computer technology is a double-edged sword. On one hand, it affords us quick and easy access to numerous conveniences such as bank statements, favorite shopping centers, school and health records, and more. On the other hand, it can also grant the same access to those who aren't supposed to get it. Although it's a rare occurrence, hacking has become the biggest criminal nuisance in computer history.

Make no bones about it. There's nothing innocent or cute about the hacker. Today's hackers aren't the pimply-faced teen rebels that you might be thinking of. Instead, this generation of hackers are grown individuals who are more than likely earning a living by stealing the identities of innocent, law abiding individuals and then selling those identities to others who want to slip by the system. And the only protection against these seedy people is prevention.

Computer security couldn't be more important than it is today and that's why we've taken the time to introduce it to you. You can reduce the probability of experiencing identity theft by making your computer as hacker-proof as possible. All that's needed is a little software and a lot of common sense.

1. Install an anti-virus/anti-spyware program. Anti-virus/anti-spyware software will stop malicious code from downloading and installing onto your computer while you peruse the Internet. Known as viruses, worms, or spyware, this malicious code can destroy important files and render your computer good for only one thing: sending sensitive data back to the server of an identity thief.

2. Don't store sensitive data on your computer in the first place. Should your computer get infected with a virus, worm, or piece of spyware, you can thwart the individuals responsible by not storing your personal information on your PC so that when and if your computer does send back data - it won't be anything valuable. Hackers look for things like full names, social security numbers, phone numbers, home addresses, work-related information, and credit card numbers. If these things aren't saved onto a computer, there's nothing critical to worry about other than restoring your computer to a non-virus condition.

3. Don't open files without scanning them with an anti-virus/anti-spyware program. In the past, the warning was to avoid opening files from people that you don't know. Today it's really not safe to open files from anyone (without scanning the files) because that's how viruses get spread - through files - even by mistake. So even though your co-worker may have emailed a funny video, it's no more safe to open than a video downloaded from a complete stranger. Be safe and scan each and every file you download from the Internet or receive through email regardless of where it came from.

4. Create a barrier between your computer and prying eyes. Anti-virus/anti-spyware programs are only effective after the effect. But you can prevent identity theft from occurring by installing a firewall. A firewall is software that checks all data entering and exiting a computer and it then blocks that which doesn't meet specified security criteria (user-defined rules).1

5. Don't click on website links in spam messages. In an effort to obtain personal information, some spammers will send email that asks you to click on a link. The email messages are often disguised as important messages from well-known online establishments, and they often try to scare their readers into clicking links with threats of closing an account of some sort. Sometimes the links are harmless and attempt to con the reader into volunteering personal information (credit card number), but other times the links attempt to download harmful software onto a computer.

Your best protection against computer crimes is your own knowledge. Hopefully the suggestions above will prompt you into taking appropriate action and into protecting your computer with the suggested tools. In doing so, you'll not only protect yourself, you'll prevent the spread of these malicious activities and protect others at the same time.

Networking Home Computers

Have you ever thought about networking your computers at home? If you have a small collection of computers around the house (and a small collection of computer users), you can connect each one of those computers to one another and share data, software, and hardware including a single Internet connection. There are many creative uses for home networking, however it's an ideal situation when upgrading each computer to the same capability is financially out of the question. On a home network, each computer has access to the equipment of the better machine in the group as if that equipment were their own.

Connecting computers with either an Ethernet cable or a Wireless connection can create a home network. The easiest and cheapest method uses an Ethernet connection, which requires a series of network cards, a cable for each computer, and a router. The network card is similar to the old modems we used in the past to connect to the Internet, however in a home network, it's used to communicate with every computer that's connected to it.

You'll want to first, select the computers that will connect to each other and then install the network cards inside each of them. Then you'll connect a cable to each computer that will communicate with the server. These cables won't connect to the server directly. Instead, they'll connect to the router. To enable Internet access for each computer, this router will need to connect with a modem of the host machine.

Once the hardware is set up correctly (you'll need to read the instruction manual of your equipment for details), you can then setup the network from Windows on each machine. Within Windows, you can set up a home network similar to the way that you set up an Internet connection. Only this time, you'll set up a LAN (Local Area Network) connection.

Windows should walk you through setting up a LAN after starting the computer and once complete, you can begin to connect one of your machines to the network. You can do this through Internet Explorer by typing in the address and password required to access the router (the address and password required to access the router will be in the router manual).

Connected to the network, each computer can send files back and forth, open programs on a remote computer, play the sound files and videos located on another computer, and share a single Internet account to browse the web, download files, or chat with someone in an entirely different country. If a single printer is available on only one computer in the network, every connected PC can send documents to it and print them out. Kids will enjoy the ability to play multi-player games and adults will enjoy the ability to blast a single message to everyone at once or maintain a group schedule.

Since we're describing a home network that will connect to the Internet, you're strongly advised to install a protective firewall program to thwart Internet viruses, worms, or other damaging spyware code. Firewalls prevent - but they don't repair. Only anti-virus and anti-spyware programs can reverse damage. So you should install a firewall on the computer that grants access to the computer, and then install an anti-virus and anti-spyware program on each of the remaining computers in the network.

If you have files that shouldn't be shared (bank statements, credit card information, etc.), you can restrict their access in one of several ways. You can put them in a new folder and then remove the "read" permissions for that folder. Or you can specify who can (and who cannot) access specific files with a password from within Windows Control Panel.